Links and Resources

The following references were consulted in the creation of The Bases of Colour Vision, and are useful resources for additional information.

References
Boynton, R.M. (1979). Human Colour Vision. Toronto, ON: Holt, Rinehart and
              Winston.
Breedlove, S.M., Leiman, A.L., and Rosenzweig, M.R. (1999). Biological
               Psychology, 2nd Ed.
Sunderland, Massachusetts: Sinauer Associates, Inc.
Dember, W.N. (1964). Visual Perception: The Nineteenth Century. New York:
               John Wiley & Sons Inc.
Goldstein, E.B. (1999). Sensation and Perception. Toronto, ON: Brooks/Cole 
               Publishing Company.
MacAdam, D.L. (1970). Sources of Colour Vision. Cambridge:  MIT Press.
Overheim, R.D. and D.L. Wagner (1982). Light and Colour. Toronto, ON: John
               Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Pastore, N. (1971). Selective History of Theories of Visual Perception 1650-
               1950.
New York: Oxford University Press.
Pedrotti, F.L. and L.S. Pedrotti (1993). Introduction to Optics. Englewood 
               Cliffs, NJ:  Prentice Hall.
Sacks, O. (1995). An Anthropologist on Mars. New York: Vintage Canada.
Schwartz, S.H. (1999). Visual Perception: A Clinical Approach. Toronto, ON:
               McGraw Hill.
Sherman, P.D. (1981). Colour Vision in the Nineteenth Century. Bristol: Adam
               Hilger Ltd.
Zeki, S. (1993). A Vision of the Brain. Blackwell Scientific Publication: London.


Internet Resources
The following internet resources may be consulted for additional help or interest. The links are organized under the heading that corresponds to the subtopic of the tutorial that most concerns it.

Colour Vision Databases/Links Resources:
"EFG Colour Links" Created by Earl F.Glynn II, this site is a very thorough list of additional links for colour vision in general. The layout is similar to an encyclopedia, and should be viewed as such. The topics are listed alphabetically at the left side of the column.
"ELA Vision and Color Directory" Sponsored by ELA Productions, this site is similar to the previous in that it provides several links to other colour vision websites, and is a useful resource for finding additional resources. Topics are categorized, and links are listed below them.

The History of Colour Vision Science:
"Important Dates in Vision Science"  Sponsored by the University of California Irvine Vision Centre, this site lists a chronology of the history of vision science in general. The historical record dates from the 17th century to the present day, during which most of the important advances in colour vision science were made.

The Nature of Colour As Light:
"Causes of Colour" Promoted by WebExhibits, a non-profit agency sponsored by the government and several educational institutions, this site beautifully explains the origins of "colour" in nature, how we perceive colour, and colour deficiencies.
 

The Neural Bases of Colour Experience:
"Functional Retinal Morphology"
Sponsored by the University of Vienna, this site
illustrates general retinal anatomy. Perhaps the most useful information here concerns retinal distribution of cones versus rods, which is diagrammed quite well.

"Cortical Areas" subtopic, found in Visionary web site, which is sponsored by Dr. Lars Liden at Boston University.  All the major vision processing areas of the brain are depicted visually. (The Vision site is a very thorough encyclopedia of vision-related terminology).


"Retina Reference" created by Lance Hahn at PSU in  Los Angeles, this site offers many links and resources for studying the retina.

"The Retina: Gross Anatomy"
also created by Lance Hang at PSU, this site offers detailed information on the morphology of the retina.

"The Visual Cortex"
created by George Mather at the University of Sussex, this site offers a good description of functional visual cortical anatomy, and illustrates several concepts such as hypercolumns and V1 layers.

"The Eye"
created by Tutis Vilis at the University of Western Ontario, this interactive tutorial wonderfully illustrates the anatomy of the eye, and is easy to navigate.

"The Primary Visual Cortex"
by Tutis Vilis as well (UWO), this site explains functional cortical anatomy in regards to vision and colour perception.

 


Bases of Colour Vision created by 
Brian Thomas Wagner 
and Donald Kline
University of Calgary